Dyslexia Identification and Orton Gillingham Technology as a Solution

By Dr. Deborah Levy http://maxscholar.com/ Most teachers think that Dyslexia is a condition in which children reverse letters when they write.  Unfortunately, that is probably one of the least-common forms. Common symptoms which may be observed, include slow reading, very poor spelling, great difficulty sounding out words, and looking and guessing at the visual shape of word. Students with Dyslexia often see strings of letters and...

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Figures in Motion – Interactive Activity Books

Age Range: Grades 1-8 Cost Range: $12.95 to $19.95 Subject: Art, History, (Mediaeval, Renaissance, Egyptian, Civil War, etc.) Archeology, Bible History Location: Livermore, CA Website: www.figuresinmotion.com Phone : 925-583-5670 Email : info@figuresinmotion.com By Janet Esposito History is boring – and it’s our own fault. History, as it is taught in most classrooms throughout the country, tasks kids with memorizing a jumble of...

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Inspired Reading Methods
Oct28

Inspired Reading Methods

by Valerie Schuetta, M.Ed. Very often, people will ask me how I come up with so many different ways to teach reading. I tell them when I am truly inspired I seem to come up with my best ideas.  It feels effortless. I like the word “inspire” because it implies creativity and creativity is what I strive to integrate into all my lessons. I guess the bottom line is that I feel so passionate about children becoming the successful readers...

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Handwriting Questions
Oct28

Handwriting Questions

By Nan Barchowsky, BFH, Barchowsky Fluent Handwriting, www.bfhhandwriting.com Our Age of Technology is intriguing, amazing, confounding and frustrating. Something is always new! Specifically, how should we meet challenges in classrooms? Handwriting is hotly debated. Will it become obsolete as we use the growing number of digital ways to communicate? Or should we save handwriting? Should we look to solutions used elsewhere in the...

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Learning Disabilities or Learning Styles?

www.solimaracademy.com  by Mariaemma Pelullo-Willis, M.S. “Even when she was 10, Helen Keller remained deaf, blind, and mute. By 16 she had learned to read in Braille, and to write and speak well enough to go to Radcliffe College. She graduated with honors in 1904. Fortunately her first teacher had never heard of the term ‘learning disabled.’ Unable to use her sense of sight or hearing, Helen Keller learned first through touch. And...

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